Clinical Trial

Study to evaluate advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in cats with diabetes mellitus

Department: Small Animal Internal Medicine Service

Overview

Title:
Comparison of plasma and urine advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and biomarkers in cats with regulated diabetes mellitus and healthy cats: A pilot study

Investigators:
Jackie Gross, DVM (Internal Medicine resident)

Joe Bartges, DVM, PhD, DACVIM, DACVN (Internal Medicine faculty) Andrew Bugbee, DVM, DACVIM (Internal Medicine faculty)

If interested please contact our Clinical Trials Coordinator Lisa Reno via email (lisar@uga.edu) or phone at 706-296-7818.

Study description:
Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis and complications of diabetes mellitus in human beings, but they have not been evaluated in cats with diabetes mellitus. AGEs occur from the interaction of carbohydrates with proteins and may have a role in the cause and treatment of diabetes mellitus. The purpose of this study is to evaluate plasma and urinary AGEs in cats with diabetes mellitus.

Inclusion criteria:
-Diabetic cats controlled by insulin alone or combination of insulin and diet

-Controlled blood glucose less than 250 mg/d

-Serum fructosamine concentration less than 450 µM/L

Exclusion criteria:
-Uncontrolled diabetes (blood glucose > 250 mg/d and fructosamine > 450 µM/L

-Other diseases (hyperthyroidism, kidney, heart or liver disease, cancer, chronic enteropathy)

Cats will receive a physical exam and a one-time blood and urine sample will be collected for tests including serum fructosamine, plasma AGEs, urine specific gravity, urine chemical analysis, and urinary AGE determination. Costs pertaining to collection and subsequent analysis of blood and urine samples will be paid for by the study. Owners will be responsible for the costs of any treatment or additional diagnostics that may be recommended.

Duration of study:
This study is currently OPEN.

Potential benefits to veterinary medicine:
Results from this study may lead to additional studies on the role of dietary AGEs in the management of cats with diabetes mellitus and other conditions.