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Reptile

Patient positioning and preparation

Dorsoventrally compressed lizards (e.g. Bearded dragons) are usually placed in dorsal recumbency. Laterally compressed lizards (e.g. chameleons) are usually placed in lateral recumbency. Round-bodied lizards (e.g. Green iguana) can be placed in lateral or dorsal recumbency, but the author prefers lateral placement. Given the relatively small size of most pet lizards a single mid-coelomic entry point, either in a paramedian or paralumbar area, will usually permit examination of most, if not all, of the coelomic structures. The precise point of entry and position of the lizard will depend upon the particular organ or system of interest and the preferences of the endoscopist.

Chelonia are supported in lateral recumbency with endoscope entry via either of the prefemoral fossae.

Snakes are less commonly subjected to coelomic endoscopy due to the more diffuse fat body and ease of coeliotomy along the entire body length. However, when required, lateral positioning and entry between the first and second rows of lateral scales enables the scope to enter the coelom just medial to the ribs.

Potential endoscope entry area for standard left lateral coelioscopy.
Green iguana in right lateral recumbency illustrating the potential endoscope entry area for standard left lateral coelioscopy.


Left sided coelioscopy in the green iguana.
Left sided coelioscopy in the green iguana note the two handed support of the camera-sheath-telescope.


Operating room set-up and tortoise positioning for standard left prefemoral endoscopy.
Operating room set-up and tortoise positioning for standard left prefemoral endoscopy.


Insertion point for coelioscopy in tortoises and turtles.
The insertion point for coelioscopy in tortoises and turtles is located in the middle of the prefemoral fossa.

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